Symbols of 12 Apostles

Creator: Little Rock Baptist Church
Subjects: Stained Glass Windows, Corporate Records
Description: Information concerning each one of the 12 apostles in the windows of Little Rock Baptist Church.
Date: 1991
Format: Image/jpg
Original Format: Photograph, Other
Language: English
Contributor: Carlton Rolle
Pages:
Symbols of 12 ApostlesSymbols of 12 ApostlesSymbols of 12 ApostlesSymbols of 12 ApostlesSymbols of 12 Apostles
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Transcript: Little Rock Missionary Baptist Church
The North Wall, Three Chapel Windows
Designer: Daniel Cicchelli
Anchor Glass Company, Inkster, Michigan 1991

THE TWELVE APOSTLES
Symbols listed left to right, top to bottom
1). Peter - silver keys
2). Andrew - X shaped crucifix
3). James The Greater - escallop shells
4). John - chalice and serpent
5). Phillip - cross and two loaves of bread
6). Jude - sailing vessel
7). James The Less - saw
8). Matthew - money bags
9). Thomas - spear-carpenter's square
10). Bartholomew - flaying knives
11). Simon - fish-bible
12). Matthias - battle axe-text

St. Andrew, AP.M., 1st cen. —The patron of Russia, Scotland, and the Ecumenical Patriarchate. According to tradition St. Andrew was crucified on an X shaped cross, known as a saltire or St. Andrew's cross, in Achaia. A silver saltire on a blue field.

St. Bartholomew, AP.M., 1st cen.— - Armenia and India are believed to have been the areas of his missionary work. He is said to have been flayed alive and crucified. Flaying knives with silver blades and gold handles, on a red field.

St. James the greater, AP.M., 1st cen. — The patron of Spain and of pilgrims. He is mentioned as the first of the disciples to go on a missionary journey. The escallop shells refer to pilgrimage. Three gold shells on a blue field.

St. James the less, AP.M., 1st cen.— This symbol refers to the tradition that St. James was cast down from a pinnacle of the temple in Jerusalem, stoned and sawn asunder by the Jews. A saw with silver blade and gold handle, on a red field.

St. John, AP.EV., 1st cen. — This emblem of St. John, the "Beloved Apostle," refers to the legend of a poisoned chalice being offered to him, in an attempt made on his life. A gold chalice, a silver serpent, on a blue field.

St. Jude. AP.N1., 1st cen. — The sailing vessel here represents the Church, which
St. Jude (also known as Thaddeus or Lebbaeus) carried to many ports as he journeyed as a missionary. A gold ship with silver sails, on a red field.

St. Matthew, AP.EV.M., 1st cen. — The moneybags refer to the occupation of St. Matthew before he was called to follow Christ. He was a tax gatherer known as Levi. Silver moneybags, on a red field.

St. Matthias, AP.M., 1st cen. —Chosen, 0- by lot, to replace Judas Iscariot, St. Matthias served as a missionary in Judaea, where he is said to have been stoned and beheaded. A battle axe with silver head and tawny handle, white open book with inscription "super Mathiam" in black except the upper case "M", of red, all on a red field.

St. Peter, AP.M., 1st cen. — Because he felt unworthy to die as had Christ, St. Peter requested that his cross be inverted so that he might look Heavenward as he was crucified. A gold cross, silver keys of the Kingdom of Heaven, all on a red field.

St. Philip, AP.M., 1st cen. —It was to St. Philip that Christ addressed his remark concerning the feeding of the multitude. (St. John 6, 7). The roundels represent two loaves of bread. A gold cross, silver roundels, on a red field.

St. Simon, AP.M., 1st cen. —The companion of St. Jude on many missionary journeys, St. Simon was known as a great fisher of men through the power of the Gospel. A gold Book, page edges of white, silver fish, all on a red field.

St. Thomas, AP.M., 1st cen.— The patron of builders. He is said to have built a Church with his own hands in East India. The spear refers to the instrument of his martyrdom. A carpenter's square with silver blade and gold handle, spear with silver head and tawny handle, all on a red field.

Judas Iscariot, 1st cen. — Thirty pieces of silver with a straw colored rope on a black field.